It’s Friday! 

How was your literate life this week? As always, I’m here in your Inbox to celebrate our literate lives with a sneak peek into my own, but this week was a bit different because my family and I celebrated Thanksgiving together. This meant a bit less notebooking and learning….but a lot more baking and conversation.

A Lit Life: Gifts for Readers!

by Stephanie, November 25, 2020

I adore the holidays. My family and I have many traditions to look forward to: our beloved advent calendar, putting up Christmas lights, the annual nerf gun war with grandparents and decorating gingerbread houses, even with teenagers. =) This year was certainly one for the record books and the entire experience has made me prioritize what matters most this holiday season.

And for me, that means making reading (and writing!) a priority throughout my days. It’s truly my personal form of self-care and I’ve been exploring small indulgences to make my reading life even more delightful. I’ve browsed, favorited and added things to my cart that are lighting my reading heart on fire and now, I’m sharing them with you. Here are my top gifts that I’ve either received, plan to give to others or have already bought for myself (shhhhh!):

A Lit Life: November 20, 2020

by Stephanie, November 23, 2020

It’s Friday! 

How was your literate life this week? As always, I’m here in your Inbox to celebrate our literate lives with a sneak peek into my own. Here’s what I’ve been reading, writing, learning and exploring this week:


What I’m Reading:


I picked up Waiting for Normal by Leslie Connor solely because it was set in a town not too far from where I teach. I knew many students would get excited reading about their hometown, visualizing the businesses and streets mentioned and feeling like they were truly in the story. But I received so much more. I hadn’t expected for Addie to have leapt off the pages and into my heart. I hadn’t expected to think through the challenges of poverty in the way I did. I hadn’t expected to explore the impact of mental illness on children. I hadn’t expected to redefine my understandings of family and what it means to be a hero. But I did. What started as a book to explore a local town became a book to explore the hidden challenges (and small delights) of a child’s life. It is a must read.

A Lit Life: November 13, 2020

by Stephanie, November 13, 2020

It’s Friday! 


How was your literate life this week? As always, I’m here in your Inbox to celebrate our literate lives with a sneak peek into my own. Here’s what I’ve been reading, writing, learning and exploring this week:


What I’m Reading:


One of my reading goals for 2020 was to read more adult fiction books in addition to my voluminous reading of children’s literature. And by more, I meant at least one. =) I’m happy to report that I’ve done that and more. 


This week, I FINALLY read The Vanishing Half by Britt Bennett, a book that has been on TBR list for quite some time. Admittedly, it took me a chapter or two to become deeply invested in the characters, but once I did, I couldn’t stop turning the pages. Desiree and Stella, Jude and Kennedy….they were in my mind and heart even when I stepped away from the pages. If you’re looking for a story about finding yourself, about family relationships, then read this book. If you’re looking for a story to learn about the world, to question it and to examine your own place in it, then read this book. I know I’ll carry the lessons learned in my heart for a long time. 

A Lit Life: November 6, 2020

by Stephanie, November 06, 2020

It’s Friday! 


How was your literate life this week? As always, I’m here in your Inbox to celebrate our literate lives with a sneak peek into my own. Here’s what I’ve been reading, writing, learning and exploring this week:


What I’m Reading:


I had a very limited attention span this week, so I reached for books that could give me the quick win of finishing it in a single setting or two. The first was a beautiful short story by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie titled Zikora (and it’s only $1.99!). It was highly recommended, so I dove in, completely invested from the first powerful sentence: All through the night my mother sat near me but never touched me. As someone who loved What We Carry by Maya Shanbhag Lang, a beautiful memoir that explored the complexities of mother-daughter relationships, I knew I’d love this book. And I was right. I was so drawn into Zikora’s life and when I unexpectedly turned to the last page (I was reading a digital version of the book), I was heart-broken and still am. I NEED to know how the story unfolds. And I know you’ll feel the same. 

A Lit Life: October 30, 2020

by Stephanie, October 30, 2020

It’s Friday! 

How was your literate life this week? As always, I’m here to celebrate our literate lives with a sneak peek into my own. Here’s what I’ve been reading, writing, learning and exploring this week:


What I’m Reading:


I was worried that I wouldn’t find the time in my busy week to start and finish When You Were Everything by Ashley Woodfolk, but I shouldn’t have been. I was hooked only four pages in and then found the time to finish the book because I HAD to. Caught between the memories of being sixteen and the present day challenges of parenting one of my own, I could not put this book down. Ashley Woodfolx invited me into Cleo’s life and while I expected typical teenage drama, I did not expect to be so profoundly impacted as a parent, a daughter and a friend. Cleo taught me a great deal about what it means to be yourself, to stand strong and to learn from your mistakes, a hard lesson for everyone, but one I especially needed. And Ashley’s then-and-now format gave me the exact structure I needed to do the same for myself. 

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